Children who goes hungry in early life, engage in violence later

June 22 2016
Children who goes hungry in early life, engage in violence later

A study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health says that children who often go hungry are more than twice as likely to develop impulse control problems and engage in violence later in life.

The study reveals that 37% of the participants, who frequently suffered from hunger in childhood, reported that they had been involved in interpersonal violence.

Childhood hunger contributes to a variety of other negative outcomes, including poor academic performance.

The researchers used data from the US National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions to examine the relationship between childhood hunger, impulsivity, and interpersonal violence.
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